International Standards and Conformity Assessment for all electrical, electronic and related technologies
section-visual

Electrical Energy

IEC helps keep the power on

 

Technology
enablers

 

The IEC is the key partner for all actors in the energy sector, providing most of the technical International Standards for automation, power generation, transmission and distribution, electrical components and devices. The behind-the-scenes engineering and scientific work the IEC delivers enables existing and new technology to work in the most energy-efficient way.

title

Interoperability

 

 

 

 

 

title

UPnP (universal Plug and Play)

 

 

 

title

Universal power charger for mobile phones

 

 

 

title

Functional safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

title

Industrial-process measurement, control and automation - System aspects

 

 

title

Cards and personal identification

 

 

 

 

 

title

IEC CA (Conformity Assessment) Systems

 

 

 

title

Safety

 

 

 

 

 

title

Interview

 

 

 

 

 

title

EMC
(Electromagnetic compatibility)

 

 

 

 

title

Interview

 

 

 

 

 

title

Environment and hazardous substances

 

 

 

 

title

Terminology

 

 

 

 

 

Technology enablers

 

 

The IEC is the key partner for all actors in the energy sector, providing most of the technical International Standards for automation, power generation, transmission and distribution, electrical components and devices. The behind-the-scenes engineering and scientific work the IEC delivers enables existing and new technology to work in the most energy-efficient way.

 

 

Interoperability

Interoperability refers to the ability of two or more devices from the same vendor (or different vendors) to exchange information and use that information to co-operate correctly.

 

 

UPnP (Universal Plug and Play)

 

UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) technology allows devices to cross multivendor and multi-technology networks seamlessly. The International UPnP Standard was developed by the IEC and ISO within joint technical committee ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC (Subcommittee) 25: Information technology – Interconnection of information technology equipment.

 

 

Universal power charger for mobile phones

 

A major international achievement of TC 100: Audio, video and multimedia systems and equipment, has been to standardize a universal power adapter and charger solution for mobile terminals and other ICT (information and communication technology) devices to enable interoperability between a common EPS (external power supply) and a data-enabled mobile telephone.

 

 

Functional Safety

 

Functional safety is fundamental to enable the complex technology used for safety-related systems. It provides the assurance that these systems will offer the necessary risk reduction required to ensure safe operation of the equipment.

 

 

SC 65 A: Industrial-process measurement, control and automation - Systems aspects

 

SC 65 A: Industrial-process measurement, control and automation - Systems aspects develops International functional safety Standards. Information on the preparation and use of basic safety publications and group safety publications can be found in IEC Guide 104. This guide should be used in conjunction with ISO/IEC Guide 51.

 

 

ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 17

 

ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 17: Cards and personal identification develops International Standards for Registration authority procedures in interoperability authentication protocols.

 

 

IEC CA (Conformity Assessment) Systems

 

The IEC CA (Conformity Assessment) Systems help to ensure that a product or system meets the relevant IEC International Standard, that means it will be safe to use anywhere in the world.

 

 

Safety

 

When it comes to electrical energy, governments want to protect their populations from unnecessary risks. Buyers want proof about a product or system’s safety, performance and reliability. Consumers want to be able to trust the products or services they are purchasing.
The IEC helps protect human lives and reduce liability risks for manufacturers by producing International safety Standards which take into account the integrity of installations and systems and by operating CA (Conformity Assessment) Systems. The assignment of horizontal safety functions and group safety functions is the responsibility of the IEC ACOS (Advisory Committee on Safety), subject to confirmation by the IEC SMB (Standardization Management Board).

 

Live electrical work is extremely hazardous because wires can be active without showing any visible indication of being charged, and because electric shock can result from low currents.
IEC TC (Technical Committee) 78: live working, develops international standards for tools, equipment and devices intended for work on and near live parts of electrical installations and systems.

 

 

Watch the video

Green Safety: Facilitating Global Trade

Keith E. Williams, President & CEO, Underwriters Laboratories

 

In the 21st century, green safety is as important as were electrical safety and fire safety to the 20th century. Standards provide a competitive edge to companies to limit unfair competition, achieve significant cost-savings, and simplify access to many more markets. Underwriters Laboratories believes that the IEC represents the opportunity to harmonize standards globally so that manufacturers can make one product and serve all the world markets in a manner that will be safe to the planet and human kind.

 

 

EMC (Electromagnetic compatibility)

 

EMC describes the ability of electronic and electrical systems or components coexist without causing interference to one another when they are close together.
The IEC's approach to EMC standardization is based on achieving compatibility between controllable emissions and the immunity of equipment. International Standards are prepared with the design stage in mind rather than waiting for the point at which problems have arisen and need to be solved.
IEC TC (Technical Committee) 77: Electromagnetic compatibility, and its SCs prepare International EMC Standards to ensure designers and engineers have access to reference material such as specifications and technical reports from the very beginning of the design cycle.

 

 

Watch the video

Globally concerted efforts – Developing enterprise

Dr Naoya Takahashi, President & CEO, Hitachi Systems, Ltd.

 

In this IEC Global Visions interview, Dr Naoya Takahashi, President and Chief Executive Officer, Hitachi Systems, Ltd., shares why Hitachi believes that a concerted effort and collaboration of many companies results in the faster development of the global technical rules his industry needs. Why it is necessary for globally active companies to not only use international standards, but actively participate in the standardization process and how this can lead to new opportunities and helps build enterprise. Dr Takahashi further explains Hitachi's engagement in Social Innovation Business and how his company plans to contribute to the reduction of 100 million tons of CO2 annually, by 2025.

 

 

Environment and hazardous substances

 

All IEC International Standards and CA (Conformity Assessment) activities work toward minimizing the effect on the environment and optimizing the use of resources.
TC 111: Environmental standardization for electrical and electronic products and systems, works on International Standards that contribute to the harmonization of market and regulatory requirements around the world at the technological level. IEC TC 111 deals with generic aspects of environmental issues applicable to all electrotechnical products.

Environmental concerns are covered by a number of other TCs: IEC TC 100: Audio, video and multimedia systems and equipment, established TA (Technical Area) 13 to deal with environmental issues.ISO/IEC JTC (Joint Technical Committee) 1 created JTC 1/SC 39: Sustainability for and by Information Technology to cooperate closely with TC 111 and other standardization organizations in order to avoid overlap.

 

 

Terminology and symbols

 

The establishment of a comprehensive and consistent terminology is a prerequisite for the development of International Standards and for their understanding and implementation by end users.

IEC TC 1: Terminology, sanctions the terms and definitions used in different electrotechnical fields and determines the equivalence of the terms used in different languages. It prepares the IEV (International Electrotechnical Vocabulary) for standardizing and co-ordinating the terms relating to electrical sciences and techniques for use in technical language and literature, in technical specifications and in commercial exchanges, and in giving their equivalents in different languages. Terminology can be an important tool in managing market expectations and ensuring that different stakeholders understand each other. In the wind industry for example common terminology allows buyers, investors and vendors to understand turbine performance, wind classes and abrasion resistance making it easier to compare different designs with one another.