International Standards and Conformity Assessment for all electrical, electronic and related technologies
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Electrical Energy

IEC helps keep the power on

 

Clean and
sustainable energy

 

Modern life is unthinkable without electricity - it transforms lives.

As energy consumption is forecast to double between now and 2030 the IEC is working hard to help improve energy efficiency, provide clean energy and to make its work accessible to all countries. The IEC and the thousands of experts that form the IEC Community are committed to bringing reliable and safe electricity to the world, including the 1.3 billion people who need it most urgently.


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Satisfying future energy needs

 

 

 

 

 

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Interview

 

 

 

 

 

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Efficiency gains in thermal power electricity generation

 

 

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Reducing losses in transmission /
distribution

 

 

 

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Redesign of the Grid

 

 

 

 

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Energy efficiency in manufacturing

 

 

 

 

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Using energy more efficiently

 

 

 

 

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White Paper

 

 

 

 

 

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Improving energy efficiency for industry and consumers

 

 

 

 

Clean and sustainable energy

 

 

Modern life is unthinkable without electricity - it transforms lives.

 

As energy consumption is forecast to double between now and 2030 the IEC is working hard to help improve energy efficiency, provide clean energy and to make its work accessible to all countries. The IEC and the thousands of experts form the IEC Community are committed to bringing reliable and safe electricity to the world, including the 1.3 billion people who need it most urgently.

 

 

Satisfying future energy needs

 

IEC work covers all areas of electrical energy from generation to end use. One of the biggest challenges facing us is to increase energy efficiency. Today a 30% increase in energy efficiency is possible with currently available technologies.

However, looking forward, the IEC believes that the whole energy chain will need to be redesigned. The IEC is now putting in place the processes and structures that enable it to support this redesign.

 

 

Watch the video

Strengthen IP – Increase revenue

Dr Ja-Kyun Koo, CEO, LSIS

 

Ja-Kyun Koo, Chief Executive Officer of LSIS, a global leader in power solution, automation and green business, explains why it is so important for a company to be able to monetize R&D and IP investment and how a standardization strategy can help in this.

 

 

Efficiency gains in thermal power generation

 

Two thirds of primary energy used in this sector today is lost. Energy-efficient technologies include combined gas and steam turbines (TC5: Steam turbines), CHP (co-generation of heat and power), and fuel cells (TC 105: Fuel cell technologies) used in combination with CHP.

 

 

Reducing losses in transmission / distribution

 

Around 9% of generated electricity is lost through transmission and distribution. Upgrading to UHVAC and UHVDC (ultrahigh voltage alternating and direct current) (TC 22: Power electronic systems and equipment and soon a new TC) and using superconducting cables (TC 20: Cables and TC 90: Superconductivity) can greatly reduce this loss

 

 

Redesign of the Grid

 

In many countries large parts of the existing grid infrastructure date back to the 1960s or even earlier. Redesign of the grid architecture into a responsive electrical infrastructure, or Smart Grid, designed to help lower costs and optimize energy use is essential. The IEC provides the majority of technical International Smart Grid Standards, some of which are essential to any Smart Grid.

 

 

Energy efficiency in manufacturing

 

Industry accounts for over 40% of the world’s consumption of electric energy; 2/3 of this electricity is used to drive electric motors. Increasing the efficiency levels of these motors by a few percentage points has a significant impact on overall energy consumption.
TC 2: Rotating machinery, prepares International Standards for electric drives used in all industrial sectors and provides a global energy efficiency rating for electric motors, which is in the process of being complemented by a global motor efficiency label.

 

 

Lowering electricity consumption in residential and commercial buildings

 

Residential and commercial buildings consume around 40% of total energy used. The following are just some ways that can reduce power consumption:
More efficient lighting: TC 34: Lamps and related equipment.

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning, the use of heat pumps: SC 61C: Safety of refrigeration appliances for household and commercial use
More efficient elevators and escalators:
TC 2: Rotating machinery
Energy management systems: TC 57: Power systems management and associated information exchange.

Stand-by power reduction:TC 59: Performance of household and similar electrical appliances
Sensors: TC 76: Optical radiation safety and laser equipment.

 

 

Coping with the energy challenge

 

With this IEC White Paper, the IEC is laying the foundation for the electrical energy efficiency discussion.

 

The IEC MSB (Market Strategy Board) analyzed the wide array of energy efficiency opportunities and technologies that are available. Based on this the IEC developed a model projecting what it believes is likely to happen in the next 20 years. This White Paper is a summary of those reflections and constitutes a roadmap and recommendations that will allow the IEC to develop the many standards that are needed to enable highest short- and long-term energy efficiency outcomes, today and tomorrow.

 

 

Improving energy efficiency for industry and consumers

 

Measuring performance for electric cooking ranges, hobs, ovens and grills for household use is essential for producers and consumers alike.
TC 59
: Performance of household and similar electrical appliances, and its subcommittees prepare International Standards for clear, complete, reliable and globally recognized energy efficiency guidelines which cover white goods and appliances such as vacuum cleaners.
SC (Subcommittee) 59K: Ovens and microwave ovens, cooking ranges and similar appliances prepares International Standards to measure these appliances’ performance levels.
TC 100
: Audio, video and multimedia systems and equipment, has developed the International Standard for measuring the energy efficiency of the latest generation of television sets, video recording equipment, set top boxes, audio equipment and multifunction equipment for consumer use.
TC 100
and TC 59 have pioneered the measurement and testing methods for standby power consumption that enabled the global roll out of one watt standby power regulations.