International Standards and Conformity Assessment for all electrical, electronic and related technologies
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Electrical Energy

IEC helps keep the power on

 

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Electricity generation results from the conversion of mechanical or thermal energy from primary sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear or renewable energies into electric energy. The expansion of global electricity-generating capacity and its overall economic impact would not be possible without the multitude of IEC International Standards.

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Thermal power plants

 

 

 

 

 

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Nuclear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Renewable energy certification

 

 

 

 

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Renewable energies

 

 

 

 

 

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Solar photovoltaic (PV)

 

 

 

 

 

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Marine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hydropower

 

 

 

 

 

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Solar thermal
electric plants

 

 

 

 

 

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Wind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Geothermal

 

 

 

 

 

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Interview

 

 

 

 

 

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UN Sustainable Energy for All initiative

 

 

 

 

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Interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

Generation

 

Electricity generation results from the conversion of mechanical or thermal energy from primary sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear or renewable energies into electric energy. The expansion of global electricity-generating capacity and its overall economic impact would not be possible without the multitude of IEC International Standards.

 

 

Thermal power plants

 

Steam and gas turbines dominate electricity generation in coal, gas and oil fuelled thermal power plants worldwide. TC 5: Steam turbines, prepares International Standards for machines used in fossil fuel and nuclear power plants, geothermal and concentrated solar power installations, as well as OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion).

 

 

Nuclear

 

TC 45: Nuclear instrumentation, prepares International Standards for the electronic and electrical functions, associated systems and equipment used in the I&C (instrumentation and control) systems of nuclear energy generation facilities. This covers nuclear power plants, fuel handling and processing plants, interim and final repositories for spent fuel and nuclear waste.

 

 

Renewable energy certification

 

IECEE (the IEC Conformity Testing and Certification System for Electrotechnical Equipment and Components) is the worldwide exclusive issuer of the PV Quality Mark and Quality Seal, ensuring that PV components and products comply with International safety and performance Standards and relevant specifications. The World Bank specifies both the PV Quality Mark and IEC International Standards for tenders, including those for photovoltaic systems.

IECRE (IEC System for Certification to Standards Relating to Equipment for Use in Renewable Energies) is an international CA (Conformity Assessment) System that provides testing, inspection and certification for renewable energy sectors such as wind energy, marine energy and PV Solar.

 

 

Renewable energies

 

The share of renewable sources in energy generation is forecast to reach nearly a third of total generation by 2035. The IEC prepares the majority of International Standards for all Renewable Energy sources.

Renewable Energies brochure pdf file 461 KB

 

 

 

Solar Photovoltaic (PV)

 

TC 82: Solar photovoltaic energy systems, prepares International PV Standards for systems that convert solar energy into electrical energy and for all the elements in the entire PV energy chain, including off-grid lighting systems. Solar lanterns are important sources of light after dark in rural communities without access to electricity.

IEC has released a new TS (Technical Specification) IEC/TS 62257-9-5 for solar-powered light-emitting diode (LED) lighting devices, such as solar lanterns. Part of the effort to expand access to modern off-grid lighting among low-income households in developing countries, the new specification represents an important step in aiding governments to harmonize their national standards, paving the way for market expansion for quality-assured devices.

TC 21
: Secondary cells and batteries, has prepared IEC 61427-1 covering general requirements and test methods for secondary cells and batteries for renewable energy storage in PV off-grid applications.

 

 

Marine

 

Marine energy (wave, tidal, river and ocean current, as well as OTEC - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) is slowly growing in importance. Research has been ongoing for more than 30 years, but many technologies still await broad commercial roll-out.
TC 114: Marine energy - Wave, tidal and other water current converters, covers International marine energy Standards for all systems that convert this form of energy into electrical energy. The work of TC 4: Hydraulic turbines, also relates to marine energy generation through tidal flows as they are found in estuaries.
The IEC CAB (Conformity Assessment Board) is evaluating the Conformity Assessment needs of the marine energy industry with a view to establishing a CA Scheme for marine energy converters.
Guidelines for design assessment of OTEC systems have been developed by TC 114. OTEC also uses steam turbines (TC 5: Steam turbines).

 

 

Hydropower

 

Hydropower is currently the largest source of clean energy in the world - installed in over 160 countries it accounts for 16% of overall electricity generation.
TC 4: Hydraulic turbines, prepares International Standards on the design, manufacture, installation, testing, operation and maintenance of hydraulic machines including turbines, storage pumps and pump turbines. Small, micro- and pico-hydro stations, often important in remote and rural off-grid locations, are also covered by IEC International Standards.

 

 

Solar thermal electric plants

 

TC 117 : Solar thermal electric plants, prepares International Standards for Solar thermal electric (STE) plants which concentrate solar power from a wide area to produce heat that drives a heat engine (usually a steam turbine) to generate electricity. This technology is now ready for a broad range of commercial applications.

 

 

Wind

 

Wind energy is set to expand rapidly in the next decades thereby maintaining its position as the leading Renewable Energy source. TC 88 : Wind turbines, produces the International Standards that have proven essential for meeting the complex challenges faced by the wind power industry. The whole industry, buyers, vendors, investors and regulators - uses IEC International wind turbine Standards and terminology to manage expectations in terms of turbine design, efficiency, output and abrasion resistance.
Experts from IEC TC 88 and TC 57: Power systems management and associated information exchange, work together within JWG 25 to develop International Standards for monitoring and control systems and associated information exchange for wind power plants. The IEC is also putting in place a Conformity Assessment Scheme focused on wind energy installations.

 

 

Geothermal

 

Geothermal heating and cooling uses the energy stored as heat beneath the earth's surface. Heat pumps are used at depths of up to 400 m to raise the temperature to the level required by the hot water, heating or cooling application. At greater depths, with temperatures from 25-150°C, heat extracted from the ground and groundwater can be supplied to a district heating network, to a CHP installation, or to drive local heat pumps. TC 5 and SC 61D prepare International Standards for the turbines and heat pumps used in solar thermal and geothermal energy systems.

 

 

Watch the video

Increase bankability - build markets and industries

Sandy Butterfield, Founding CEO and CTO Boulder Wind Power

 

In this IEC Global Visions interview, Sandy Butterfield, Founding CEO and CTO of Boulder Wind Power, a pioneer in the US wind industry, provides insights into the key factors that allowed this industry to develop. He explains how international standardization allows his company to sell products globally, stimulates innovation, increases stakeholder confidence and the ability to obtain financing.

 

 

UN Sustainable Energy for All initiative

 

The IEC is one of many organizations and agencies participating in the UN’s efforts to further its sustainable energy goals and it is recognized that IEC International Standards play a major role in meeting this challenge.The IEC is part of the the Energy Access Practitioner Network to address market barriers and achieve universal energy access.

 

 

Watch the video

Shared knowledge – Increasing trust

Gang Wu, Chairman & CEO, Goldwind

 

Gang Wu, is the Chairman & CEO of Goldwind, the largest manufacturer of wind turbines in China, and among the largest globally. In this IEC Global Visions interview he explains how active participation in IEC work allowed his company to jump development hurdles, learning from the mistake of others. How this shared knowledge helped improve wind turbine design, performance and reliability and ultimately built the trust needed to sell globally. In 2006 Gang Wu received the World Wind Energy Award.