International Standards and Conformity Assessment for all electrical, electronic and related technologies
Main title

Colour Management

 

 

Displays

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Image courtesy of Jegsworks

Equipment using cathode ray tubes

Cathode ray tubes, or CRTs, are used in computer and monitors, televisions and oscilloscopes. They use RGB colour syntheses. IEC work defines input test signals, measurement conditions and methods of measurement for cathode ray tube displays. This enables proper colour characterization and comprehensive comparisons of measurement results.

 

IEC colour management standards on equipment using cathode ray tubes

 

 

 

 

 

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Image courtesy of Sharp

Equipment using liquid crystal display panels

Liquid crystal display panels, or LCDs, are now replacing cathode ray tubes in computer monitors and, to a lesser degree, in television sets. They offer high resolution, a flat screen and space-saving designs. All new colour technologies need high colour definition and good colour management. Similar to cathode ray tubes, IEC work in this area defines input test signals, measurement conditions and methods of measurement for liquid crystal display panels, which make colour characterization and comprehensive comparisons of measurement results possible.

 

IEC colour management standards on equipment using liquid crystal display panels

 

 

 

Equipment using plasma display panels

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Image courtesy of Sharp

Plasma display panel, or PDP, technology was developed in the 1960s and was rather slow to pick up. It began its commercial life in the military field and was not pursued at that time by the computer business, which preferred LCD to PDP monitors. Like LCDs, PDP monitors have the advantages of high resolution, flat screens and space-saving designs. Their main advantage is that they have a higher resolution capacity than LCDs and are, therefore, more adequate for larger screens, such as in large screen, high definition TV and DVD technologies. This comes from the way images are produced.

 

A plasma display is composed of two parallel glass sheets, containing millions of cells that, in turn, contain a gas mixture of neon and xenon. As electricity is sent through a set of electrodes close to the cells, the gas is excited and emits ultraviolet light. This light strikes the phosphor coating of the glass and causes red, green and blue light to appear.

 

IEC work in this field defines input test signals, measurement conditions and methods for plasma display panels. These make for efficient colour characterization and comprehensive comparisons of measurement.

 

IEC colour management standards on equipment using plasma display panels